Category Archives: Blog

More Articles on Opioid Restrictions

Thank goodness more and more physicians and health care providers are realizing that opioid restrictions have caused an increase in illicit drug use and overdoses. Sensible and safe prescribing is necessary, but just as necessary is to provide patients with a good quality of life and chance in partnership in care.

Great article from Practical Pain Management.

Symptoms of Low Glucose?

I’ve had 2 patients in two days with exactly the same complaints. These complaints are common and I myself have had these symptoms or similar symptoms in the past.

Shakiness, tremors, sweating, tingling, headaches, fatigue, queasiness sometimes, and the desperate need to eat sugar. As soon as you eat something sweet you feel better. Sometimes it can make a person so weak, need to lie down. Happens at any time. What is causing this?

These symptoms are typical of a stress reaction. Oh No. There she goes again. Is everything Stress? nope. So low glucose is a cause of stress. So any physical illness, can stress your body enough to cause this reaction and it can be from low blood glucose, pain, emotional stress, any and all of the above.

It’s fine to grab carbs and some protein and fat to get that instant relief, but don’t ignore the symptom. It’s a sign that something is wrong. See you health care provider.

have a great day

Judy

Interest Growing in ACEs

Good morning bloggers

It has been a difficult month in terms of time. I won’t share my troubles as they are miniscule compared to most – I am so lucky in having my health and only time constraints – but I have missed chatting on my blog.

Last night I found #ACEs on twitter and hope that you find time to visit the hashtag. I have a link to an article on the effect of ACEs Washington Post but you will also find many useful links even on twitter.

I also found great inspiration @Dating4Disabled – many links to articles about inspiring people. At the height of my mini-crisis – I woke with anxiety and after reading only one article, had my problem in perspective.

I hope to have more time this weekend to share some pain thoughts, but find it most helpful to do this with my patients in the room – team work wins every time, and our computers are down for now. So watch this space.

I’ve shared some blog posts on Stories if you are interested.

Have a great day and weekend

All the best

Judy

Fibromyalgia

Good morning readers

Long weekend this weekend and I’m about to head into the garden. I wanted to wish you a good weekend. If you feel well, pace yourselves so that you don’t get hurt.

I have added an article about a possible genetic link to fibromyalgia in widespread pain section.

I have shared videos on Fibromyalgia (click the blue).  

New article supports a genetic basis so Fibromyalgia: Article. 

Another reason – I have learned that we all have a switch in our genes that can be turned on by trauma- even when your mother is pregnant in her third trimester. Switching this gene on leads to an increase in proteins that cause inflammation. 

If any of you wish to share a pain story or would like more information, feel free to contact me in the contact section. I think I had a problem with the email link, and will be trying to sort that out this morning.

All the best

Judy

Some changes to home page

Hello Readers

I have added a few changes to home page. I’d appreciate any comments or suggestions for improvements.

Thank you

Judy

Dissociation of mind and body

J is with me today – Hey Jay.

Jay says her idea of a good day is when she hurts because it means she has done enough and it’s been a productive day. Very interesting. 

What I found with Jay is dissociation. I use that term a little differently than some doctors. Many people who have had a traumatic childhood learn early on that their pain and their feelings don’t matter. That is one way to dissociate. Your mind learns to block off your body’s needs. And that includes cutting yourself off from your Limbic System.    

Not all people who have dissociation have parents who are too overwhelmed to cope. In Jay’s case, she had wonderful parents who were very supportive. They taught her many different clever tools to cope with emotional pain. But then Jay suffered traumas: school bullying and another large trauma. 

Trauma can block your ability to take notice of your body’s needs. That can lead to you doing too much and injurying yourself. Pacing is very hard for people who feel they are not enough. Not good enough. 

Sometimes being productive is a form of anxiety. The more you feel you need to control your environment around you, the more anxious you are. Do you need things to be just right? Do you want the house tidy? if not then you feel uncomfortable. Or tasks are left undone and that bothers? The more these things bother you, the more anxious you are. 

Today is just a rambling day. Exploring issues with Jay and sharing them with you. Thank you Jay

 

Judy

Malnourishment

Hi Readers
When I think of malnourishment, my mind usually skips to the food pyramid. I think about all the days I have way, way, waaaay less than 5 servings of fruit or vegetables. Thank goodness for Psyllium. And I think about how our ideas of a healthy diet are changing. To keto or not to keto?

But today I’ve been struck by the number of people I’ve seen in one week who are malnourished. When I look at their histories, I see similarities in their pasts. The sort of malnourishment they’ve suffered most from, is not one related to food.

I see the results of difficult childhoods. Malnourished childhoods. Childhoods where parents, damaged in various ways themselves, have been unable to provide their children with the tenderness, kindness, and the unconditional love they needed as children and young adults.

And then I think of my own feelings; the times I eat when I’m not hungry – when I’m eating to chase out boredom, or eating to drown emotions. Ever had that feeling where no matter what you eat, you never feel full?

When we grow up in difficult childhoods, to survive, we have to block out our emotions. We teach ourselves to ignore our needs. Especially when those needs are regularly ignored by the very people who are supposed to be taking care of us. We learn that what we feel is not important. What is important, is to survive.

There are so many choices we make to survive. Some of us forget. Others make excuses, or live in an alternate reality where we imagine ourselves or our parents to be other people. What we do have in common is an empty space. A hole that needs filling. And sometimes that hole seems most easily filled with food and alcohol.

When we come from difficult homes, we don’t have the tools necessary to adjust well to stress. When we don’t cope – our behaviors are judged and we are often shamed. If you’re like me, then you’re often your own worst judge. So when we turn to food, (your’s truly), or alcohol (I would if it weren’t for the enormous harm I’ve seen it cause), then we shame ourselves.
Our fat rolls become a symbol of our failure, and a drinking spree a confirmation that we are not enough.

These feelings are buried deep. We lock our deepest needs in the part of the brain that keeps the score – the limbic system. The trauma turns on a gene that increases inflammation and if we are eating too much sugar – we get fatty livers and diabetes. If we are drinking too much, we get hepatitis. And if we are unlucky, we get chronic pain.

I am so lucky to have a life where I’ve been exposed to the wisdom of teachers: (Jesus Christ. Mohammed. Buddhists.); the patience and resilience of my patients; my husband, who introduced me to Buddhism and mindfulness; and teachers I find on the internet and in books, they’ve helped me on my journey of healing.

It is a journey. The destination is not important. Every day I wake to tell myself I am strong enough. I am good enough. There are always doubts – but’s that’s okay.

Start with nourishing yourself. Feed yourself with the love that surrounds you. If you are open to it, the universe will feed you, and then you can feed love to others.

Wishing you an open heart to receive the love that is out there.
All the best
Judy

Hand Arthritis

I have added some links for painful hands from arthritis. Remember motion is potent lotion.

Go to https://painimprovement.com/hand-pain/

This technique above can be used for painful feet too, like plantar fasciitis

Have a good day

Judy

What is the Third Brain?

I see the brain as 3 different organs. huh?

First brain is every part of the brain excluding the Limbic system.

The second part of the brain is the limbic system, spinal cord. and your Sympathetic and Parasympathetic system. Flight Fright Fight System.

The third part of the brain is the celiac plexis. That is a collection of nerves in the gut and i believe it is what the Chinese call Qi (Chi). Core. From where you are supposed to breathe. Think of your body like a tree. The trunk is the Qi. it’s where your strength lies. Do the daily program every day and breathe to balance your Qi.

Good Luck

judy

Continued research into Chronic Pain

Hello Bloggers

Slowly but surely momentum is gaining as the medical community acknowledges just how far we have to go before we can claim an understanding of the pain crisis. Canada is spending a chunk of money to help the fight against chronic pain, seeking means of educating doctors about the management of pain. Link below.

Link to www.canada.ca

New WHO classification for chronic pain. 

It is reassuring to see a change in the social media. The trickle of information needs to gather strength so that the message can reach as many people as possible.  I love being able to read about people using their voices so effectively in this struggle. Keep at it. 

Have a great day

Judy